IndieBooks discount codes

Hi everybody!

We’ve had a few people get in touch after having problems activating our promo codes when purchasing books from our website.  To make sure you can take advantage of your discount, please add your voucher code before you click checkout, as shown in the picture below. We hope this helps and if you have any further problems please don’t hesitate to contact frances@indiebooks.co.uk.

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p.s the code shown (FPP) is still live and will deduct the cost of postage when you pre-order Explaining Cameron’s Catastrophe or Explaining May’s Miscalculations – Happy Friday!

What Brexit Means For Us

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One of our authors was asking the other day about the impact of Brexit on IndieBooks. So we thought we’d share our answer.

The most immediate impact is that our books will be more expensive to print. Almost all the paper we use comes from sustainable forests in Scandinavia, and paper is the biggest single cost in book production, and with the Pound down 20% since Brexit, that paper will rise in cost accordingly.

The second is that Brexit will have a profound effect on the economy, reflected in the eye-watering projections for the UK national debt: and if people have less money in their pockets, then book sales will suffer just like everything else.

The third is that our export sales will be worth more to us, again because of the fall in the value of the pound. That’s welcome – but though we’re always trying to export more, it’s still not going to do much to offset the negative impact.

The biggest impact, though, is cultural: the sense of the UK cutting itself adrift from the rest of Europe. Even if there were no financial cost, we’d still think it wrong to leave the EU because of the barriers it creates. It’s one reason we’re delighted to have three new European authors joining us in 2017, and why we’ll be promoting our books much more in the rest of Europe too.

And if you want to know why it happened, then watch out for ‘Explaining Cameron’s Catastrophe’,  in which Sir Robert Worcester and his colleagues explore the wealth of polling data to reveal why people voted as they did and what it means for the future. This follow-up to ‘Explaining Cameron’s Comeback’ is due out in January 2017.

 

 

Guest Blog: John Williams

If current events have left you at a bit of a loss for words, we can recommend one of our own in-house political experts to help make sense of it all. John Williams, author of IndieBooks’ ‘Robin Cook: Power and Principles’ and ‘Williams on Public Diplomacy’, has started his own blog, and there are some tasters below.

John was director of communications and press secretary at the Foreign Office for six years. Working for Robin Cook, Jack Straw and Margaret Beckett, he was the chief media advisor to the Foreign Office on every major international event since the Kosovo conflict, and was heavily involved in the negotiations with Iran on its nuclear programme. He was also political correspondent of the London Evening Standard, and political editor and columnist for the Daily Mirror, in a journalistic career that spanned 25 years.

President of the Parallel Universe

‘The reality is even more shocking than the expectation. Within days of becoming President, Donald Trump has made all predictions lame by comparison with the daily spectacle of leader and his spokespeople telling aggressive untruths.

Falsehoods have been re-branded ‘alternative facts’, by Kellyanne Conway, who glories in the title Counselor to the President, while defending the White House spokesman, Sean Spicer, for insisting that the Inauguration had been the most well-attended ever.

This is a parallel universe in which the President is always right, the truth is whatever he says. [‘House Science Committee chairman: Americans should get news from Trump, not media‘]. This will be the strategy when things start to go wrong. The objective is to make all evidence suspect if it counters what the President tells his supporters to believe.

As George Orwell put it in describing the one-party state in his 1984: ‘The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command…’

I wish I were confident that the President and his spokespeople will fail, but there are millions of voters who see no alternative and hear no alternative, to the leader’s truth. This is a sinister political correctness – only the leader can be right.

I saw a quote somewhere this morning from Jan Masaryk, a great Czech opponent of tyranny: ‘The truth prevails, but it’s a chore’.’ Read more…

Fact and Fiction in the Post Trump era

‘Donald Trump has changed the rules of politics and challenged the whole basis of strategic communication, with his disregard for facts and evidence. Trump is not the first politician to succeed by getting away with some distortion, but he has put blatant falsehood at the centre of his strategy for capturing the most important democratic position in the world. So it is no longer possible to say that strategic communication – in politics – has to respect facts and reject knowing falsehood, or pay the price in defeat.

It is the speed of social media that has made the Trump technique possible, of instantly setting the agenda by bewildering opponents and reducing old-fashioned fact-based journalism to flat-footed irrelevance.

The paradox of social media is that its miraculous potential for free speech and open minds has given strength to narrow minds and hatefulness. Some social media outlets regard facts as whatever you want to believe. False or distorted news echoes round them, and the more people react, like them, post angry comments about them, the more their readers believe this is the truth because the volume the internet traffic gives falsehoods the credibility of quantity. The sheer quantity of this internet traffic seems to its consumers to be a validation of what they are reading.’ Read more…

 

With a little help from our friends

We are delighted to announce that Apostrophe Books will be producing the eBook for ‘From Syria With Love’, on a not-for-profit basis.

We’re really exited to have them join us on this project, as we know they will be invaluable in helping us spread the message of From Syria With Love even further, and raising more money for this amazing charity.

One exciting development is the slightly revised cover for the eBook (and indeed, any reprints), to include an endorsement from literary giant, Michael Morpurgo.

In December we were lucky enough to be invited to the ‘Singing for Syrians’ carol service at St Margaret’s church in Westminster (special thanks here to Pamela Carrington for the invitation, and Victoria Prentis MP for organising a great event), where we were able to talk to Michael and give him a copy.

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Thank you to everyone for your support so far, and don’t forget the paperback is still available from our website and all good bookshops .

Announcing the Little Lit Series

Yesterday Faber announced the launch of ‘Faber Educational Editions‘, a new series for GCSE, IGCSE and A Level students. Each edition combines the complete text of a frequently studied Faber work with an ‘approachable, stimulating and author-approved study guide’.

As a small independent publisher, it is sometimes hard to predict where the industry is heading – but it’s good to know that this time we definitely seem to be on the right track.

In March 2017 we will be releasing our ‘Little Lit’ series, aimed primarily at A-Level and undergraduate students. Written by leading academics in their field, the Little Lit books offer a more sophisticated analysis of the chosen texts than their alternatives, whilst being condensed enough to remain affordable for students, and accessible to the general reader.

The current titles are as follows, with more to come in the future!

  • Henrik Ibsen: ‘A Dolls House’, Stephen Siddall
  • Reading Dickens’ Bleak House, Richard Gravil
  • T S Eliot: ‘Prufrock’ and ‘The Waste Land’, C J Ackerley
  • Joseph Conrad: ‘The Secret Agent’, Cedric Watts
  • D H Lawrence: Selected Short Stories, Andrew Harrison
  • English Renaissance Drama: A Very Brief Introduction, Charles Moseley
  • Paul Scott: ‘The Raj Quartet’ and ‘Staying On’, John Lennard
  • Mary Shelley: ‘Frankenstein’, Esseka Joshua
  • Ted Hughes: New Selected Poems, Neil Roberts
  • Reading Thomas Hardy: Selected Poems, Neil Wenborn

“Excellent … It deserves wide circulation as an introduction to the study of Lawrence’s short fiction and I would have no hesitation in recommending it to both A level and undergraduate students.”

Peter Preston on Andrew Harrison’s ‘D.H Lawrence: Selected Short Stories’ 

About the Authors 

Chris Ackerley is a celebrated scholar of Modernist and Postmodernist writing. His specialty is annotation, particularly of the works of Malcolm Lowry and Samuel Beckett. His books include: A Companion to “˜Under the Volcano (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1984); Demented Particulars: The Annotated “Murphy” (1998; 2nd ed., rev. Tallahassee, FL: Journal of Beckett Studies Books, 2004); The Faber Companion to Samuel Beckett (London: Faber & Faber, 2006) with S. E. Gontarski; and Obscure Locks, SimpleKeys: The Annotated “Watt” (Tallahassee, FL: Journal of Beckett Studies Books, 2005).

Richard Gravil is the author of three monographs, and of Literature Insights on Elizabeth Gaskell: Mary Barton and Wordsworth: Lyrical Ballads. He has edited or co-edited Master Narratives: Tellers and Telling in the English Novel (Ashgate, 2001), and critical works on Swift, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. He is Commissioning Editor of Humanities-Ebooks, LLP; Chairman of the Wordsworth Conference Foundation, and Director of the Wordsworth Winter School.

Andrew Harrison lectures in English Literature at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany. He has published numerous articles on D. H. Lawrence, and is the author of D. H. Lawrence and Italian Futurism (2003), co-editor (with John Worthen) of a casebook of modern critical essays on Sons and Lovers (2005). He edits the Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies.

Essaka Joshua teaches at the University of Notre Dame. She has published several articles on Romantic and Victorian literature, including studies of Mary Shelley, William Wordsworth, Thomas Lovell Beddoes, and Charlotte Brontë. Dr Joshua is the author of Pygmalion and Galatea: The History of a Narrative in English Literature (Ashgate, 2001), and a textbook on The Remains of the Day (First and Best, 2004) and The Romantics and the May Day Tradition (Ashgate, 2007).

John Lennard has taught for the Universities of London, Cambridge, and Notre Dame du Lac, for the Open University, for Fairleigh Dickinson University on-line, and as Professor of British and American Literature at the University of the West Indies—Mona. His publications include But I Digress: The Exploitation of Parentheses in English Printed Verse (Clarendon Press, 1991), The Poetry Handbook (OUP, 1996; 2/e 2005), with Mary Luckhurst The Drama Handbook (OUP, 2002), and Of Modern Dragons and other essays on Genre Fiction (HEB, 2007).

Charles Moseley teaches English and Classics in the University of Cambridge, and was formerly Programme Director of the University’s International summer Schools in Shakespeare and English Literature. He has written extensively on Shakespeare and mediaeval literature, and in this series has written on Henry IV, The Tempest and Richard III. (Charles is also author of the wonderful Latitude North).

Neil Roberts is a Professor of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of George Eliot: Her Beliefs and Her Art (Elek, 1975), Ted Hughes: A Critical Study (with Terry Gifford, Faber, 1981), The Lover, the Dreamer and the World: the Poetry of Peter Redgrove (Sheffield Academic Press, 1994), Meredith and the Novel (Macmillan, 1997), Narrative and Voice in Postwar Poetry (Longman, 1999), D. H. Lawrence , Travel and Cultural Difference (Palgrave, 2004), Ted Hughes: A Literary Life (Palgrave, 2006), and D. H. Lawrence: ‘Women in Love’ (Literature Insights, 2007). He is the editor of A Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry (Blackwell, 2001) and of The Colour of Radio: Essays and Interviews by Peter Redgrove (Stride, 2006).

Stephen Siddall has taught Shakespeare courses for university students and for the University of Cambridge International Summer School. He has directed for BBC television and for the (open air) Pendley Shakespeare Festival and has written a student guide for Macbeth (2002), Shakespeare on Stage (2008) and Landscape and Literature (2009) for Cambridge University Press.

Cedric Watts, Research Professor at Sussex University, has written six books on Conrad (including ‘A Preface to Conrad and The Deceptive Text’) and has edited ten volumes of Conrad’s fiction (among them ‘Nostromo’ and ‘Heart of Darkness’). 

 Neil Wenborn has published widely both in Britain and in the United States. His works include biographies of Haydn, Stravinsky and Dvoøák. He is co-editor of the highly respected History Today Companion to British History (Collins & Brown) and A Dictionary of Jewish–Christian Relations (Cambridge University Press), as well as of the poetry anthology Contourlines: New Responses to Landscape in Word and Image (Salt Publishing). A collection of his poetry, Firedoors, is published by Rockingham Press.