Announcing the Little Lit Series

Yesterday Faber announced the launch of ‘Faber Educational Editions‘, a new series for GCSE, IGCSE and A Level students. Each edition combines the complete text of a frequently studied Faber work with an ‘approachable, stimulating and author-approved study guide’.

As a small independent publisher, it is sometimes hard to predict where the industry is heading – but it’s good to know that this time we definitely seem to be on the right track.

In March 2017 we will be releasing our ‘Little Lit’ series, aimed primarily at A-Level and undergraduate students. Written by leading academics in their field, the Little Lit books offer a more sophisticated analysis of the chosen texts than their alternatives, whilst being condensed enough to remain affordable for students, and accessible to the general reader.

The current titles are as follows, with more to come in the future!

  • Henrik Ibsen: ‘A Dolls House’, Stephen Siddall
  • Reading Dickens’ Bleak House, Richard Gravil
  • T S Eliot: ‘Prufrock’ and ‘The Waste Land’, C J Ackerley
  • Joseph Conrad: ‘The Secret Agent’, Cedric Watts
  • D H Lawrence: Selected Short Stories, Andrew Harrison
  • English Renaissance Drama: A Very Brief Introduction, Charles Moseley
  • Paul Scott: ‘The Raj Quartet’ and ‘Staying On’, John Lennard
  • Mary Shelley: ‘Frankenstein’, Esseka Joshua
  • Ted Hughes: New Selected Poems, Neil Roberts
  • Reading Thomas Hardy: Selected Poems, Neil Wenborn

“Excellent … It deserves wide circulation as an introduction to the study of Lawrence’s short fiction and I would have no hesitation in recommending it to both A level and undergraduate students.”

Peter Preston on Andrew Harrison’s ‘D.H Lawrence: Selected Short Stories’ 

About the Authors 

Chris Ackerley is a celebrated scholar of Modernist and Postmodernist writing. His specialty is annotation, particularly of the works of Malcolm Lowry and Samuel Beckett. His books include: A Companion to “˜Under the Volcano (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1984); Demented Particulars: The Annotated “Murphy” (1998; 2nd ed., rev. Tallahassee, FL: Journal of Beckett Studies Books, 2004); The Faber Companion to Samuel Beckett (London: Faber & Faber, 2006) with S. E. Gontarski; and Obscure Locks, SimpleKeys: The Annotated “Watt” (Tallahassee, FL: Journal of Beckett Studies Books, 2005).

Richard Gravil is the author of three monographs, and of Literature Insights on Elizabeth Gaskell: Mary Barton and Wordsworth: Lyrical Ballads. He has edited or co-edited Master Narratives: Tellers and Telling in the English Novel (Ashgate, 2001), and critical works on Swift, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. He is Commissioning Editor of Humanities-Ebooks, LLP; Chairman of the Wordsworth Conference Foundation, and Director of the Wordsworth Winter School.

Andrew Harrison lectures in English Literature at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany. He has published numerous articles on D. H. Lawrence, and is the author of D. H. Lawrence and Italian Futurism (2003), co-editor (with John Worthen) of a casebook of modern critical essays on Sons and Lovers (2005). He edits the Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies.

Essaka Joshua teaches at the University of Notre Dame. She has published several articles on Romantic and Victorian literature, including studies of Mary Shelley, William Wordsworth, Thomas Lovell Beddoes, and Charlotte Brontë. Dr Joshua is the author of Pygmalion and Galatea: The History of a Narrative in English Literature (Ashgate, 2001), and a textbook on The Remains of the Day (First and Best, 2004) and The Romantics and the May Day Tradition (Ashgate, 2007).

John Lennard has taught for the Universities of London, Cambridge, and Notre Dame du Lac, for the Open University, for Fairleigh Dickinson University on-line, and as Professor of British and American Literature at the University of the West Indies—Mona. His publications include But I Digress: The Exploitation of Parentheses in English Printed Verse (Clarendon Press, 1991), The Poetry Handbook (OUP, 1996; 2/e 2005), with Mary Luckhurst The Drama Handbook (OUP, 2002), and Of Modern Dragons and other essays on Genre Fiction (HEB, 2007).

Charles Moseley teaches English and Classics in the University of Cambridge, and was formerly Programme Director of the University’s International summer Schools in Shakespeare and English Literature. He has written extensively on Shakespeare and mediaeval literature, and in this series has written on Henry IV, The Tempest and Richard III. (Charles is also author of the wonderful Latitude North).

Neil Roberts is a Professor of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of George Eliot: Her Beliefs and Her Art (Elek, 1975), Ted Hughes: A Critical Study (with Terry Gifford, Faber, 1981), The Lover, the Dreamer and the World: the Poetry of Peter Redgrove (Sheffield Academic Press, 1994), Meredith and the Novel (Macmillan, 1997), Narrative and Voice in Postwar Poetry (Longman, 1999), D. H. Lawrence , Travel and Cultural Difference (Palgrave, 2004), Ted Hughes: A Literary Life (Palgrave, 2006), and D. H. Lawrence: ‘Women in Love’ (Literature Insights, 2007). He is the editor of A Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry (Blackwell, 2001) and of The Colour of Radio: Essays and Interviews by Peter Redgrove (Stride, 2006).

Stephen Siddall has taught Shakespeare courses for university students and for the University of Cambridge International Summer School. He has directed for BBC television and for the (open air) Pendley Shakespeare Festival and has written a student guide for Macbeth (2002), Shakespeare on Stage (2008) and Landscape and Literature (2009) for Cambridge University Press.

Cedric Watts, Research Professor at Sussex University, has written six books on Conrad (including ‘A Preface to Conrad and The Deceptive Text’) and has edited ten volumes of Conrad’s fiction (among them ‘Nostromo’ and ‘Heart of Darkness’). 

 Neil Wenborn has published widely both in Britain and in the United States. His works include biographies of Haydn, Stravinsky and Dvoøák. He is co-editor of the highly respected History Today Companion to British History (Collins & Brown) and A Dictionary of Jewish–Christian Relations (Cambridge University Press), as well as of the poetry anthology Contourlines: New Responses to Landscape in Word and Image (Salt Publishing). A collection of his poetry, Firedoors, is published by Rockingham Press.

Entertainments for the Trump epoch

“The election had an apocalyptic feel to it,” says Mr. Thiel, wearing a gray Zegna suit and sipping white wine in a red leather booth at the Monkey Bar in Manhattan. “There was a way in which Trump was funny, so you could be apocalyptic and funny at the same time. It’s a strange combination, but it’s somehow very powerful psychologically” New York Times, 11/01/17

‘Apocalyptic and funny’, respectively, also describe our two latest releases – entertainments for the Trump epoch – ‘begat’ and ‘Attu’.

Attu, released shortly before Christmas, but available for free today on the kindle store, is an escapist eBook for those currently absorbed with anxious political thoughts (so everyone)…

‘A mischievous president announces the End of the World. He’s joking – isn’t he? Eight billion people around the world aren’t so sure.’

 

Today is also the perfect opportunity to announce our latest acquisition – begat – perhaps the first serious comic novella of the Trump era, by Dr Felix Culpepper of Cambridge University.

‘begat’ – out this spring – charts a national plunge into political and social madness with eerie parallels to today’s apotheosis of Trump. It is a satirical study of how an apocalyptic monster is created: ‘the mob drains all the evil stowed within their ids into one phantasmagorical abortion of a human, cherished for his deformities’.

As a taster, you can download an extract of ‘begat’ from our website.

The UK Government Guide to European Union Negotiations Published

As Britain now prepares for its most crucial negotiations in a generation, IndieBooks is republishing the UK Government’s official Guide to European Union Negotiations.

Originally commissioned in 1996, the Guide explains how the EU works, how to build alliances and develop successful strategies, and the most effective negotiating and lobbying techniques – all of which remain relevant to the Brexit deal-making that will follow Article 50.

The Guide’s author James Humphreys was himself an EU negotiator and more recently visiting Professor of Government at City University. He has contributed a new preface to set the Guide in the context of Brexit. In it he says:

“The world has moved on since the Guide was first published. But its key messages – about how to secure the best possible deal from Europe – are if anything more important than ever. Brexit is the defining political and economic decision of our times. The Guide provides some sharp insights about the realities to come.”

Unusually for a government publication, the Guide has a lively and engaging style, making it an ideal introduction for the Euro-novice. It also includes specially-commissioned cartoons by Banx of the Financial Times.
IndieBooks will also soon be publishing the definitive account of the EU Referendum, ‘Explaining Cameron’s Catastrophe’, by Sir Robert Worcester, the Founder of MORI, and his colleagues. This will be the latest in the influential ‘Explaining…” series, including 2016’s ‘Explaining Cameron’s Comeback’ on the 2015 election.

For more information please contact frances@indiebooks.co.uk. eBook available here now.

 

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Our Brexit Titles

screen-shot-2017-01-09-at-14-01-54Today’s Guardian has a fascinating piece on publishers’ plans for post-Brexit books. So we thought we’d give a preview of the two – perhaps three – IndieBooks Brexit-linked titles due out in 2017.

In the lead is ‘Explaining Cameron’s Catastrophe’, the follow-up to last year’s guide to the 2015 election, ‘Explaining Cameron’s Comeback’. Political analyst and pollster Sir Robert Worcester leads a team of academics and experts exploring how the EU referendum came about, how the campaign was fought and – crucially – what lay behind the outcome, with insights into the state of Britain and what it may mean for the future of politics. As always the team are working on the data right up to the print deadline but it’s currently due in the shops at the start of April.

And with Article 50 about to kick off the most important negotiation in British history since 1973, what better time for us to reissue the UK Government’s official guide to EU negotiations, the imaginatively-titled “Negotiating in the European Union”. It gives the inside story on alliance-building, multi-lateral negotiations, procedures, tactics and even the best restaurants to recover in afterwards, and is illustrated by the FT’s cartoonist Banx. This is due out later in January. Let’s hope Boris has his copy to hand.

And finally, for all those who found ‘Five on Brexit Island’ a bit of light relief, we’re hoping to sign up our own tongue-in-cheek guide to Britain’s post-Brexit future entitled ‘Mr Brexit: the Man with the Plan’.

More to follow on all these and more.

Our Xmas Present to You!

To say thanks tattu-cover-midrezo all our readers and contributors for your support in 2016, we’ve just published Attu, a short story by Richard “Unbearably exciting and witty” Major about a playboy President who announces the end of the world. It’s a mix of black humour and political satire with a hint of romance – the ideal antidote to too much Festive Good Cheer (or anxiety about soon-to-be President Trump).
Attu is available as a free e-book over the Christmas holiday. Just click here and download from the Kindle store in the usual way, but you won’t pay anything and you get to keep it. You can tell all your friends too – but the discount only lasts until the end of Boxing Day, so hurry!

Last chance…

A gentle reminder that IndieBooks’ order deadline for deliveries before Christmas will be midday tomorrow. For those deliberating, use code CMAS20 for a 20% discount on all our titles! (Excluding charity title, ‘From Syria With Love’).

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Hidden Gems of 2016

The week is off to a good start at IndieBooks after seeing Latitude North included in yesterday’s Guardian article “Hidden gems of 2016: the best books you may have missed”.

Charles Moseley’s Latitude North (Indie Books £20) ventures even further towards the pole, following a lifelong passion for the icy landscapes of Greenland and Spitsbergen. Moseley draws on his expertise as a literary scholar to weave the history and myth of the northern lands into accounts of his own travels. The result is a lyrical treasure chest of anecdote and insight.

So if you are one of the unfortunate people who did miss Latitude North, order today from our website to get it before Christmas!

 

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Charles Moseley, author of Latitude North

Tune In Now

IndieBooks’ Richard Major is talking about his debut novel, Quintember, today at 4pm on BBC Radio Cambridge. Richard is one to watch – next from him we can expect not only the sequel, but also some dystopian tales for the Trump era.

Make sure to tune in, as he is as interesting in real life as you would expect from the book!

Richard has degrees in history, literature and theology, and gained a DPhil at Magdalen College, Oxford with a thesis on literary philosophy after the Reformation. He has since taught there and at universities in England, Italy, America, Australia, India, Slovenia and, most recently, Hungary. For some years he worked in New York as a journalist and commentator. He now lives with his wife and two children in Africa.

Listen here.

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A celebratory offer

We’re delighted to announce that Jessamy Taylor’s ‘King’s Company’ has reached the finals of The People’s Book Prize 2016.

To celebrate we are offering it at just £10 for the whole weekend! So if you want to find out what all the fuss is about, head to our website and use code TPBP10. 

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Launch Photos, From Syria With Love

This time last week we were getting ready for what was a very special launch for ‘From Syria With Love’ at Waterstones in Brighton. The highlight of the night was a live video chat with a couple of the children living in the Al Abrar refugee camp in Lebanon, featured in the book (pictured below is Bayan).

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So now it’s officially launched, you can get your copy here!